Survey: Zeta Finds One in Three Consumers Plan to ‘Find a Higher Paying Job’ in 2021

Zeta Pulse, a proprietary consumer sentiment survey, highlights financial lessons learned during the 2020 recession and new resolutions for 2021

NEW YORKJan. 14, 2021 — Zeta Global, an outcome-based marketing technology company that helps brands acquire, grow, and retain customers, today released insights from its latest survey regarding consumers’ financial goals for 2021.

Based on responses from 1,552 respondents across the United States, the survey sought to discover what the pandemic taught consumers about financial health, and how those lessons were shaping consumers’ financial goals for 2021.

Top insights include:

Saving More, Spending Less in 2021

  • The “Importance of Savings” was the Biggest Lesson of the Pandemic
    More than half of those surveyed (56%) said the biggest financial lesson they learned from the COVID-19 pandemic was the “importance of savings.”
    • Savings was considered 2x more important than controlling spending (28%) or paying off debt (19%).
    • 50% of respondents between ages 18-25 indicated they were likely to increase savings, compared to 45% in middle age groups (ages 25-64).
  • “Finding a New Job” is of Equal Interest Across all Ages
    33% of all respondents indicated that they plan to “switch jobs to earn more money” in 2021 as the job market improves.
    • Intent to switch jobs between the age groups of 26-64 was the same, demonstrating people at all career experience levels were potentially affected by job loss or reduced salary.
    • Men were slightly more interested in looking for a new job (28%) than women (26%).
  • Despite Pandemic Spending Shift, Consumers Still Aim to Spend Less
    Despite cutting back on travel, dining, and entertainment in 2020, 47% of people surveyed will reduce their discretionary spending even further in 2021.

Choosing the Right Banks and Credit Cards to Meet Financial Goals The survey also asked respondents about key influences for selecting a bank or credit card company.

  • Those Focused on Savings Want Lower Bank Fees
    42% of respondents cited “low fees” as the most important factor as they continue to build their savings.
    • As people stay home more frequently due to COVID-19 concerns, close proximity of ATMs is most important factor to 28% of respondents.
  • Credit Cards Are Most Likely Selected by Interest Rate Offering
    32% of respondents said low interest rates are the most important factor, followed by no annual fees (25%) and cash-back offers (23%).

To view more data-driven consumer insights across financial services, insurance, retail, travel, automotive, entertainment and other industries, request a custom report from Zeta’s Opportunity Explorer, an industry-leading real-time analytics and insights solution derived from over 200 million consumer identifiers in the United States, or sign-up for The Pulse bi-weekly insights newsletter.

About Zeta Global
Zeta Global is a data-powered marketing technology company that combines one of the industry’s largest consumer data sets (2.4B+ global identifiers) with results-driven artificial intelligence to unlock consumer intent, personalize experiences, and power business growth for Fortune 1000 companies, such as GM, Wyndham, Sprint and Progressive. Zeta has been recognized as a Leader in the Forrester Wave™ and competes with marketing cloud offerings from Oracle, SAP, Salesforce and Adobe as well as programmatic platforms including The Trade Desk. Founded in 2007 by David A. Steinberg and John Sculley, the Company is headquartered in New York City. For more information, please go to www.zetaglobal.com.

The Impact of Cooperation on Incrementality Measurement: A Lesson From the CPG Industry

Cooperation between manufacturers and sellers is an important ingredient to the successful, accurate measurement of incremental sales. CPG manufacturers and CPG retailers have been focused on organic growth driven by incremental sales—using everything from UPC codes and loyalty programs, to merchandising management and shopper marketing—to increase sales by better targeting:

  • The right offers
  • At the right shoppers 
  • At the right time 
  • And in the right location

Such a system will sound familiar to digital marketers who strive to better target prospects and create incremental lift on a daily basis.  Afterall, what benefits the category benefits everyone (a rising tide lifts all boats, as the saying goes).

Despite the reciprocal benefits that cooperation offers when it comes to incrementality measurement, the relationship between CPG retailers and manufacturers has not always been harmonious. In the early 2000s, the impact of cooperation on incrementality was thrown in question by one of the biggest retailers in the business, Walmart. 

 

Take a look at Walmart

At the start of the new Millenium, Walmart was growing at an incredible rate. In some parts of the country, the retail titan owned more than 50% of market share. 

This blend of growth and dominance led Walmart to believe they no longer needed to share their store sales data with the broader CPG ecosystem, specifically manufacturers of CPG goods. 

When they pulled the plug, the ecosystem lost the ability to understand how Walmart sales benefited overall market-level sales. (Yes, manufacturers could track their shipment data to Walmart, but this would only cover the products they specifically made—they were still blind to category and competitive sales.) 

Without this understanding, marketers in the consumer packaged goods space lost a number of capabilities. 

Among them?—The ability to calculate the incrementality of sales. A calculation needed for making the key investment decisions behind real growth for CPG manufacturers. 

Why does this matter? Well, assume you work for a manufacturer of a consumer packaged good like paper towels.

As a paper towel maker, your goal is to sell as many paper towels as possible, for as much money as possible. To realize your goal, you need incrementality measurement across all paper towel retailers and all paper towel brands to account for sales in the total market (…because not every consumer who buys your paper towels will buy them from the same retailer, and not every paper towel retailer will carry your brand). 

Compounding the Walmart problem

Walmart’s aggressive approach to pricing made matters worse. 

To see their products carried, CPG manufacturers needed to lower their wholesale prices to suit Walmart’s business model as a low-price retailer. 

In other words, by lowering their wholesale price to Walmart, manufacturers effectively subsidized the purchase of the end-consumer. 

But this subsidy only makes sense for manufacturers when they can “do the math” and determine the impact of said discount on their business’ versus overall category sales (sales made by the manufacturing competition). 

And the key to doing said math?—Well, it’s the store sales data Walmart decided to withhold.  

Paying the price

 

The decision to withhold store sales data came back to haunt Walmart when their brand began losing market share. 

Manufacturers—motivated by a need to protect their brand value, facing a lack of transparency, and denied the store sales data needed to make the best business decisions possible—started collaborating with other retailers to create product differentiation strategies that went beyond price. 

By 2011, Walmart had endured enough market erosion they capitulated on the issue, and resumed the sharing of store sales data to syndicated market providers. 

The result?—Visibility into category sales and consumer shopping behavior returned, and incrementality could finally be measured with accuracy.     

Cooperation on incrementality measurement in digital marketing

As it pertains to cooperation and information sharing, the digital marketing industry is no different than the consumer packaged goods industry. 

Collaboration through…

  • Cookies
  • Device IDs
  • Advertiser IDs
  • And more

…is what allows digital marketers like you to recognize individual consumers, run relevant tests, create ROMs, and calculate the incrementality of specific campaigns. The aforementioned identifiers can also be associated with “permissioned status” and a “persistent ID.”  

It is a system of collaboration between advertisers (who are, essentially, the equivalent of “manufacturers” in this scenario), technology companies, publishers, and retailers. The reason the system works is because every collaborative stakeholder understands that cooperation is, ultimately, in the best interest of their business to show how they contribute to increased product sales. 

What’s at risk?

Despite the benefits this system provides all stakeholders, a few dominant technology companies are considering taking a Walmart-esque approach to data restriction. The pending decisions of these major players threatens to remove advertisers’ ability to recognize individuals as they navigate the internet. Such an obstruction will make it far more difficult (perhaps even impossible) for advertisers to connect their spending (where they spend, how much they spend, etc.) to results.

(To learn more about this, please watch a recording of Zeta’s recent Addressability webinar.)

What’s next?

Will it take a decade for digital retailers to realize what it took Walmart a decade to realize?…That market dominance today (the most sales, highest site visitation, largest audience, etc.) isn’t enough to prevent market share erosion tomorrow due to data disruption? 

No one knows with certainty.

What people DO know is that this realization will come sooner or later as a lack of market-level insights slowly puts the squeeze on customer retention, customer acquisition, and sales volume. 

The painful lesson Walmart learned a decade ago should serve as a stern warning to the major tech players threatening to disrupt the current collaboration of the digital marketing world. 

Incrementality Is the Best Measure of Marketing Effectiveness

Incrementality

The move to digital promised marketers better feedback compared to traditional, offline media. But approximately 15 years into the transition, many marketers feel frustrated by a continued inability to see (with absolute certainty) which investments move the needle.

The bad news is, the most common methods of measuring effectiveness—media-mix modeling, multi-touch attribution, and panels—are flawed. 

  • The first suffers from a lack of granularity.
  • The second from a lack of accuracy. 
  • The third from a lack of scale. 

The good news is, there actually is a way for marketers to clearly see the lift they’re getting from their media spend: 

Incrementality. 

What is incrementality?  

Incrementality (or incremental measurement) is one of the newer ways to help marketers understand the true lift of their spend, and improve media planning. Moreover, it can be used to capture metrics associated with brand awareness, affinity and purchase intent. 

Similar to panel-based measurement, incrementality seeks to understand the incremental effect of exposing one set of people to a message versus another set of people who are not exposed to said message. 

The insights gained make it easier for marketers to shift precious dollars to the channels, campaigns, and messages that yield the best ROI.  

How does incrementality work? 

Incrementality seeks to evaluate the difference between the measured response rate of the exposed group (e.g., Group A) and the measured response rate from the non-exposed, control group (Group B).

Here’s an example…

Imagine your marketing team is running a campaign for Dr. Pepper. 

In the consumer market, there are a number of shoppers who faithfully purchase Dr. Pepper whenever they crave a soda. These “brand loyalists” might be exposed to the messaging of your marketing campaign, but that messaging holds no sway over their buying decision. In other words, these people are going to buy Dr. Pepper whether they see your marketing materials or not—they love Dr. Pepper, period.

From an ROI standpoint, marketing to these Dr. Pepper lovers is pointless. They don’t need to be persuaded to buy the product, they already have a case of Dr. Pepper in their shopping cart. Therefore, your marketing team doesn’t want to incorporate sales derived from this “loyalist” audience into its campaign evaluation process. What your marketing team wants to do is measure the incremental lift in sales generated by your campaign (the “extra” sales from “non-loyalists” who would not have purchased Dr. Pepper if not for the hard work of your marketing team).

By measuring the background conversion rate of shoppers not exposed to any of your marketing (Group B), you can better understand normal consumer purchasing behavior for Dr. Pepper. You can then compare that behavior to the behavior of shoppers who are exposed to your marketing (Group A). 

The difference in purchases between the marketed-to population (Group A) and the non-marketed-to population (Group B) is the true measure of performance for your marketing campaign.  

If you can demonstrate an incremental increase in purchases for the marketed-to population, you’ll know your campaign worked. But if you can’t demonstrate an incremental increase in purchases for the marketed-to population, you’ll know your campaign had no impact.  

What’s the drawback of incrementality? 

To ensure accuracy with incremental measurement, marketers must be able to access a large population of unexposed consumers to calculate a baseline. If relying on panels, these hold out segments can be difficult and costly to manage. 

For this reason, most marketers rely on a measurement partner capable of spreading the cost of data collection and analysis, in addition to providing a large, accurate data set. 

About Zeta

At Zeta, our closed-loop, AI-powered platform easily measures the true incremental lift from media spend, allowing marketers to make smarter, ROI-boosting decisions in real time. The benefit for our clients. By closing the gap between measurement and engagement, Zeta’s platform provides superior outcomes, and a better return on marketers’ media spend. Contact us directly to learn more.

What Is the Impact of User List Segmentation on Marketing Metrics?

With list segmentation specifically, email marketers can separate recipients into focused buckets. Larger buckets use broader segmentation qualifiers (geography, gender, age, etc.) while smaller buckets follow more nuanced parameters (personal interests, transaction history, etc.). This is the cornerstone of user list segmentation impact, and why it can improve email marketing metrics (e.g. opens, clicks, etc.). The impact of user list segmentation on email The age of the generic, mass-mailed email is approaching its terminus. As unread emails pile up and inboxes grow more cluttered, there isn’t any reason for recipients to engage with an email that isn’t catered to them. That’s why brands looking to “up” their email marketing success pay such close attention to list segmentation. It’s the key to sending targeted emails with smart, customized messaging designed to really “click” with the recipients of a given list. Higher open rates Even brands that own strong relationships with their customers and prospects must fend off attention-stealing attacks from competing brands across all channels. In email, that means using a catchy subject line, a compelling offer, sharp visuals, and sound body copy. Trying to tick all those boxes for a list that features thousands of diverse recipients is an exercise in futility. Fortunately, this is where the impact of user list segmentation becomes clear. By creating distinct recipient lists, it becomes easier for brands to develop variable copy that can meet the various expectations of recipients with different incomes, life experiences, expectations, needs, and wants. Better click-through rates Opens are great, but if email recipients don’t take a desired action (in other words, if they don’t click on your offer) is there any real benefit to the brand? Email is the blank canvas upon which smart, list-segmenting marketers paint their masterpiece, using different CTAs, templates, messaging, and more. In doing so, they not only achieve higher open rates, but they also see better click-through rates than their non-segmenting peers. Better engagement When a shopper buys a pair of jeans from Levis.com, they receive an email confirming their purchase. The chances are high that this email will be more than a simple “confirmation”—it will be an offer-laden communique with links to other products that are tied to their shopping history. Maybe the email will even contain a discount that can be applied to a future purchase. Using behavioral-based list segmentation, Levis is doing more than sending a simple “thank you for your purchase” email—they’re subtly kicking off the next sales cycle. The confirmation email that’s automatically triggered when a purchase is made is designed to incorporate details of the recipient's segmentation (e.g their previous purchases) to deliver a more compelling, eye-catching message that increases the likelihood of additional sales down the road. Fewer unsubscribes Personalized content is relevant content, and relevant content is less likely to lead to the dreaded “unsubscribe” button. In terms of valuing the impact of user list segmentation, simply seeing fewer unsubscribes makes the juice worth the squeeze for many brands. (Added bonus—user list segmentation can lead to an increase in deliverability too since the email will be less likely to hit spam filters.) Want to learn more about the impact of user list segmentation? With the right strategy and the right tools, you can leverage list segmentation and personalization to take your email marketing to the next level. Talk to the team at Zeta!

To answer the question What Is the Impact of User List Segmentation on Marketing Metrics you need to first understand why user list segmentation is so powerful. 

User list segmentation makes it possible to send personalized messages to prospects and customers across channels (especially email). As we’ve illustrated before, personalization is the key to modern marketing success. So, giving a business the ability to speak at a 1:1 level to a wide variety of customers leads to a number of benefits. 

Impact of User List Segmentation

With list segmentation specifically, email marketers can separate recipients into focused buckets. Larger buckets use broader segmentation qualifiers (geography, gender, age, etc.) while smaller buckets follow more nuanced parameters (personal interests, transaction history, etc.). This is the cornerstone of user list segmentation impact, and why it can improve email marketing metrics (e.g. opens, clicks, etc.). 

The impact of user list segmentation on email

The age of the generic, mass-mailed email is approaching its terminus. As unread emails pile up and inboxes grow more cluttered, there isn’t any reason for recipients to engage with an email that isn’t catered to them. 

That’s why brands looking to “up” their email marketing success pay such close attention to list segmentation. It’s the key to sending targeted emails with smart, customized messaging designed to really “click” with the recipients of a given list. 

Higher open rates

Even brands that own strong relationships with their customers and prospects must fend off attention-stealing attacks from competing brands across all channels. In email, that means using a catchy subject line, a compelling offer, sharp visuals, and sound body copy. Trying to tick all those boxes for a list that features thousands of diverse recipients is an exercise in futility. Fortunately, this is where the impact of user list segmentation becomes clear. By creating distinct recipient lists, it becomes easier for brands to develop variable copy that can meet the various expectations of recipients with different incomes, life experiences, expectations, needs, and wants. 

Better click-through rates

Opens are great, but if email recipients don’t take a desired action (in other words, if they don’t click on your offer) is there any real benefit to the brand? Email is the blank canvas upon which smart, list-segmenting marketers paint their masterpiece, using different CTAs, templates, messaging, and more. In doing so, they not only achieve higher open rates, but they also see better click-through rates than their non-segmenting peers. 

Better engagement

When a shopper buys a pair of jeans from Levis.com, they receive an email confirming their purchase. The chances are high that this email will be more than a simple “confirmation”—it will be an offer-laden communique with links to other products that are tied to their shopping history. Maybe the email will even contain a discount that can be applied to a future purchase. 

Using behavioral-based list segmentation, Levis is doing more than sending a simple “thank you for your purchase” email—they’re subtly kicking off the next sales cycle. The confirmation email that’s automatically triggered when a purchase is made is designed to incorporate details of the recipient’s segmentation (e.g their previous purchases) to deliver a more compelling, eye-catching message that increases the likelihood of additional sales down the road. 

Fewer unsubscribes

Personalized content is relevant content, and relevant content is less likely to lead to the dreaded “unsubscribe” button. In terms of valuing the impact of user list segmentation, simply seeing fewer unsubscribes makes the juice worth the squeeze for many brands. (Added bonus—user list segmentation can lead to an increase in deliverability too since the email will be less likely to hit spam filters.) 

Want to learn more about the impact of user list segmentation?

With the right strategy and the right tools, you can leverage list segmentation and personalization to take your email marketing to the next level. Talk to the team at Zeta!

A Back-to-School Guide for Marketers in the Year of COVID-19

back-to-school

Back-to-school shopping is going to be a lot different this year. 

Under normal conditions, almost 60% of back-to-school shoppers are largely done with their major purchases before the start of August. But this summer we’re seeing households (from households with elementary-aged kids to households with college students) delay their traditional back-to-school buying by several weeks. 

We’ve also seen a real shift in what products back-to-school shoppers are most interested in. Instead of new shoes and pencil cases, consumers are shopping for kid-sized masks, laptops, and hand sanitizer.  

Expect more back-to-school buying to be done online than ever before, with out-of-home movement and retail visitation both plateauing due to the COVID-19 resurgence that’s still taking place. 

back-to-school

Get additional insights in the infographic below.

back to school

 

AI-Powered Website Personalization

Website Personalization

Overview

The following infographic presents statistics and trends around the adoption of AI-powered website personalization across various industries. The infographic highlights what modern marketers think about website optimization using AI, and how different brands are already deploying it realizing improved ROI.

Introduction

As a marketer, you tap every channel you can (organic, paid, social, email, etc.) to lure visitors to your brand’s website, and get those visitors to engage with your content.

But attracting quality traffic and getting that traffic to stick around (i.e. increase time on page and lower bounce rates) is an exhaustive task.

At least it used to be.

AI-powered website personalization is starting to make life a whole lot easier for marketers looking to create positive digital results for the brands they represent.

By using real-time signals and quality data inputs, an AI-powered personalization engine can make sense of the interests, intentions, and innuendos of users who visit a website. Those insights make it easier for AI to create a tailored website experience for each individual visitor.

The following infographic provides a snapshot of how AI-based website personalization is being used. More specifically, it includes…

  • An overview of how AI-powered personalization engines work.
  • Detailed statistics on the adoption of AI across industries.
  • The impact of personalization on key website metrics.
  • Important facts and figures from case studies.

Artificial Intelligence Powered Website Personalization

The Acceleration from Analog to Digital: Knowing Your Customers in the New Normal

digital marketing

The global economy is reeling from the impact of COVID-19. People are working from home, avoiding shops, canceling summer holidays, and staying away from restaurants. As consumer behaviors continue to change due to the global pandemic, businesses must adapt to survive.

But the question is, what should the adaptation look like? How should businesses change to meet the expectations of the new consumer?

The answer lies in data. Specifically, data that makes it easier to understand the desires and needs of consumers in a COVID-19 economy.

Stephanie D’Sa, VP Strategy at Zeta Global, had an in-depth look at how consumer-centric data can create improved outcomes for businesses in the months and years ahead.

Stephanie joined Zeta Global in 2019 and leads the Strategy and Analytics relationships for the International portfolio. She has 15 years in CRM, Loyalty and Commercial Global Marketing experience across retailers/brands such as: Emirates Airlines, Google, IWC, Cartier, Coach, NFL, Dell, Morrisons, Sports Direct, Four Seasons Hotels & Resorts, Go Ahead Group, AMEX, Alpha Bank Bonus Loyalty, Electronic Arts (EA), BP European Markets, Dell, Modelo Continente, Woolworths SA, Rewe, AS Watson, GAME, Tesco Wine & Wine by The Case, Tesco Mobile, Tesco Telecoms’, Hugo Boss & Prada.

Download the Recording Below.

7 Email Subject Line Mistakes to Avoid

Learning how to craft a winning email subject line is one of the most important things any marketing team can do. The right subject line can help a brand stand out in an otherwise cluttered, crowded inbox.

But mastering the art of subject line writing isn’t easy—it takes time. 

Unfortunately, time isn’t something a lot of marketing teams have, especially during a recession. 

So, how can email marketers (and the brands they represent) get better open rates in as little time as possible?—By avoiding some of the classic mistakes of subject line writing. 

(Full disclaimer, you will NOT be able to avoid all of these mistakes all of the time. Just do the best you can.)

 So, without further ado, here are 7 Email Subject Line Mistakes to Avoid.

Email Subject Line Mistake #1 – Forgetting to optimize for mobile 

How often do you check your inbox every day?

And how often do you check that inbox on your mobile device?

These days, more than 61% of email opens come through mobile. That means optimizing for smartphones, tablets, eReaders, etc. isn’t just a good idea—it’s a must-do.  

Subject lines look mighty different on mobile than they do on desktop, so it’s critical to ensure your SLs are as catchy on an iPhone as they are on a MacBook Pro. 

Most email apps will only display the first 35 to 40 characters of a subject line, so put the most compelling part of your message up front. Anything beyond those first 40 or so characters won’t be visible unless your email is opened. 

Email Subject Line Mistake #2 – Being repetitive

Do you regularly use the same words in your subject lines? If so, you’re shooting yourself in the foot.

Subject lines can start to look old mighty quick, and when people start getting bored by your SLs, open rates will slide south. 

To keep things fresh, rotate subject lines with regularity—you don’t need to make dramatic changes on a week-to-week basis, but you should strive to use something decidedly different at least once every four sends. 

  • Include emojis 👍
  • Play around with and ALL CAPS. 
  • Ask questions (e.g. Tired of unsightly back hair?) or try making bold claims (e.g. Traditional Marketing is DEAD—Here’s Why…).

Email Subject Line Mistake #3 – Talking too much

Don’t use 20 words when two will do.

At Zeta, we’ve seen success using both short and long subject lines, but the shorter ones  (those with less than 30 characters) tend to enjoy higher open rates than those that go 30+

The bottom line is, shorter subject lines reflect the changing nature of content consumption. In an era of tweets, TikToks, and ten-second Instagram videos, shorter is better. The less people have to read to get your point (something this article isn’t doing a great job of!) the better your results will be. 

Email Subject Line Mistake #4 – Forgetting to personalize

Everyone knows that dropping a recipient’s first name into a subject line increases the likelihood of getting an open. Yet so many brands forget to do it (including Zeta, if we’re being honest about ourselves!).

But simply including an F_NAME token is just the tip of the iceberg—there are so many other ways to personalize.

Email templates can be personalized to reflect the weather conditions in the locality of the recipient, the recipient’s product purchase history, and so much more. 

The more you know about your recipient, the more you can personalize in a tasteful way. 

And the more you can personalize, the more you can make it feel like a genuine, 1:1 conversation (which people love) instead of a generic message sent to the masses.

Email Subject Line Mistake #5 – Failing to convey urgency or exclusivity

Few things “sell” as well as urgency or exclusivity. So, when it comes to email subject lines, injecting a little “specialness” into your copy is a good idea.

Don’t limit yourself to tired clichés like “limited time offer” and “this weekend only”, but don’t be afraid of them either because they do work.. 

If your email marketing team is struggling to come up with ways to inject a little urgency or exclusivity into subject lines, try incorporating some of these easy concepts into the text:

  • Pre-Sale…
  • Early Bird…
  • Extended Offer…
  • Last Chance…
  • Your First Look…
  • An Offer Just for You…
  • Your Thank You Gift…

Email Subject Line Mistake #6 – Skipping the “From” tag

This is LOW-hanging subject line fruit, but it’s something brands miss time and again.

Who an email is from can influence your open rate to an unimaginable degree. Ideally the “From” tag matches the text included in the subject line, so it’s 100% clear to the recipient who the email is from and why it’s important to open it. (Having said that, the “From” tag doesn’t need to be populated by a real name.)

For example…

  • Nordstrom (GOOD) VS Nordstrom Deals (BETTER)
  • Delta Airlines Service Desk (GOOD) VS Rob at Delta Customer Service (BETTER)
  • Trello (GOOD) VS Taco @ Trello (BETTER)

Email Subject Line Mistake #7 – Rushing

If you think of an email as an advertisement, the subject line is the headline. Therefore, invest in your subject lines like the great David Ogilvy would invest in his headlines…

Spend 20% to 25% of your time on the body of your email, and spend the rest on your subject line.

Will it feel weird the first few times you do it? Absolutely. But avoiding this mistake will do more for your open rates than anything else.

The more time, energy, and money you invest in your subject lines, the more creative and compelling they’ll become.

The more creative and compelling they become, the more your recipients will look forward to receiving emails from your brand.